Employee Experience Is Not Synonymous with a Better Customer Experience — Jackie Potter

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CEOs of large and small companies recognize the importance of delivering a better customer service experience, as reports reveal that businesses are losing more than $75 billion a year due to poor customer service. Furthermore, given the fact that PwC reports that 59% of customers will leave a company after multiple negative experiences and 17% after a single negative experience, it’s unsurprising that good customer service became a heated center on the new marketing battlefront. 

Companies became so invested in ensuring that their customers are getting the best customer experience (CX) that more than two-thirds of marketers responsible for CX say their companies compete primarily on the basis of CX, and 81% say that they expect to be competing entirely on the basis of CX in the next few years, according to a 2018 Gartner survey. 

However, as Jackie Potter, founder, and CEO of recruiting agency JP Talent, points out, the majority of these businesses continue to make a critical error: they frequently view employee experience as distinct from customer experience when, in reality, the two are inextricably linked. 

“These companies are so focused on meeting customer needs that they have forgotten that building a loyal and satisfied customer base is heavily dependent on employee satisfaction and performance,” she says. “High-performing employees will meet deadlines, generate revenue, and strengthen the brand through positive customer interactions. On the other hand, when employees perform poorly, consumers perceive the company to be indifferent to their needs and often quickly go on to seek assistance elsewhere.” 

Still, even though high employee engagement leads to higher productivity, job satisfaction, sales, and revenue, creating such an atmosphere in the company is easier said than done. Most companies struggle with engaging their employees and maximizing their potential, as per the latest Gallup report; 51% of employees are not engaged at their workplace, while 13% are actively disengaged. 

Nevertheless, Jackie Potter believes that this problem can be avoided from the start by implementing a structured and comprehensive hiring process. She explains that companies frequently overlook the fact that their success is contingent on their hiring practices, as a structured and comprehensive hiring process is the only way to attract the right talent. Additionally, she notes that failing to implement the proper hiring process will have the opposite effect, resulting in underperforming employees and a waste of resources, time, and money. 

“When a company is hiring a new employee, there are only two outcomes; the new employee will either contribute positively to customer satisfaction, growth, and profitability or will have a detrimental effect on the business,” Potter says. “That’s why you need to have good hiring practices that will ensure that you always get a person that will be engaged and keep your customers happy.” 

Through JP Talent services, and a 98% success rate, Jackie Potter is honored to be able to provide companies with a pipeline of candidates that will align not only with the skill set needed but with the long-term growth needed for the company too. 

“Bottom line, if you want to achieve the best results with your company, you need to hire the type of talent that will help build the company culture, drive sales, and ultimately position the company as an industry leader,” Jackie Potter says. “Or to put it simply, you need to hire the best talent there is.” 

 

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